Vintage Digital

Digital Delay

Dynacord PDD 14 Digital Delay

The Dynacord PDD 14 released in 1984, is a studio-grade, programmable Digital Delay designed and manufactured in Germany. Up to eight different sounds can be programmed into the non-volatile memory and accessed directly. There is also the possibility to alter the stored programs without altering the memory contents.

Boss DE-200 Digital Delay

The Boss DE-200 offered users a very affordable entry into digital delays, even more affordable than the Roland product of that time which was already well priced. The Boss DE-200 and it’s siblings were an exercise in simplicity, with a front panel that was as clean as it was practical, making it very easy for new comers to get around.

Roland SDE-1000 Digital Delay

The Roland SDE-1000 represented Roland’s entry into the affordable Digital Delay market and it brought quality effects for all of us. The Roland SDE-1000 Digital Delay is a high quality 12 bit digital delay machine with various attractive features including chorusing.

Roland SDE-3000 Digital Delay

The Roland SDE-3000 was a natural progression from the earlier SDE-2000 and offered better sound quality through increased bandwidth among other improvements. The Roland SDE-3000 is a high quality Delay Machine featuring various delay effects and also the Memory function that retains up to eight different panel settings, therefore, it is extremely helpful for both studio and live performance.

Lexicon Model 97 Super Prime Time Digital Delay

The Lexicon Model 97 “Super Prime Time” is a major advancement in digital audio equipment. With it you can create, store and recall an unlimited variety of effects which you have programmed, in any sequence you like. The standard unit offers a maximum delay time of 480 milliseconds, and memory extension options let you increase that to either 960 milliseconds or 1.92 seconds – all at full 20kHz bandwidth.

Bel BD-80 Digital Delay

The Bel BD-80 processor is a high quality digital delay with an expandable memory with loop edit facility, synchronised record and playback (sampling), keyboard control (1 V per octave), echo and flanging. The Bel BD-80 must be one of the most popular delay/samplers ever produced, being found in most modest home set-up to the more high-profile studio.

Lexicon PCM 42 Digital Delay Processor

The Lexicon PCM42 improved on the PCM41 and became a studio staple, even today you will find this nearly 40 year old digital delay in use aorund the world. The Lexicon PCM42 combines Lexicon’s reliability with features for musician. Unique in concept and execution, the Lexicon PCM-42 performs all of the functions you would of a high quality digital delay line, while the door to realms of musical expression that were only a dream now.

Korg SDD-3000 Digital Delay

The Korg SDD-3000 is one of those effects that has retained it’s appeal even after decades of newer product coming after it. The Korg SDD-3000 digital delay has remained so popular that Korg themselves have re-introduced it in a guitar pedal form, as it was guitarists that fell in love with this very capable delay.

Roland SDE-2000 Digital Delay

Roland’s first digital delay, the Roland SDE-2000 was a big hit when it arrived, guitarists took to it like a duck to water, as too did home recording studios. It may have had limited bandwidth with the relatively low sampling rate of 26kHz, but that did not stop the success Roland enjoyed with the SDE-2000, but it did kill off the Space Echo, for a while at least.

Lexicon PCM 41 Digital Delay Processor

The Lexicon PCM 41 was a huge success for Lexicon when it was released back in 1980 and even today you will still find them in use in major recording studios everywhere. The Lexicon PCM 41 was eventually replaced by the Lexicon PCM 42 which featured longer delay times, but retained the sonic characteristics of the Lexicon PCM 41.
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